Top 5 Resistance Band Chest Fly Exercises

The Top 5 Resistance Band Chest Fly Exercises

It may go without saying, but it’s also worth repeating: resistance bands are valuable, practical, and efficient training tools to helping you master various core body areas. Resistance bands are light-weight, easily packable and they provide versatile workout options wherever you are––at home, at the office, even on-the-go. And best of all, they are relatively inexpensive when compared to a full-time gym membership or drop-in studio.

Resistance bands are ideal for a full-body workout as they can help tone and build muscle in just about every area. It’s inexpensive equipment you can use in your every workout. And while your entire body can benefit, we’re looking specifically at the chest: five invigorating resistance band chest fly exercises that you can do just about anywhere. Chest flyes are a great isolation exercise for toning your chest muscles––especially the pectorals––as well as the upper arms. And resistance bands add another level of versatility and convenience.

Note: depending on which type of bands you are using, you may need to try out a few to find your preferred tension. Resistance bands typically run from minimal resistance to heavy. It’s a beneficial accessory for your training. Start with a medium resistance band and go from there.

Here are the top 5 resistance band chest fly exercises:

The banded chest fly

The banded chest fly with resistance band

The chest fly(also called “the pectoral fly”) is a high-intensity workout that moves the arms horizontally forward. It is great for strengthening your pectoral muscles, as well as your upper arms. And, it can be done just as effectively with resistance bands. The banded chest fly uses two bands of equal resistance(again, start with medium resistance if this is your first time), and a secure point to anchor each of them––somewhere around chest-height and 4 or 5 feet apart. Try a sturdy wall bracket or grounded backyard fence post if you’re at home.  

To start:

o  Wrap the unanchored end of the bands around each hand and step forward until the bands are taut, all the while keeping your elbows behind your back so that your arms are at a 30° angle behind the horizontal

o  Place your right foot behind you, with the ball of your foot on the floor. Your front foot should be planted with your knee slightly bent

o  Bring your arms forward, maintaining the same position in the horizontal plane, to meet in front of your chest, in a clasping motion. Ease back into the starting position. Aim for around three sets of 20 – 25 reps––or whatever your body tells you. Try to reduce the number of sets you need to get to100 reps until you can do the entire count without stopping

The banded inclined chest fly

As solid a workout as the banded chest fly can provide, it can be adjusted to work different parts of the body. By executing the banded inclined chest fly right after the previous exercise, you are not only getting the benefits of the former, but you are also placing greater emphasis on your upper chest area.

To start:

o  Anchor the band behind you near the floor and wrap each handle around your hands while holding your arms straight out to your sides, in a T formation. Place your palms forward without locking your elbows

o  Making sure to stand far enough away from your anchor (so that you have a decent amount of tension in your band), slowly pull the band forward and above your head while keeping your arms straight (you may need to slightly bend your elbows), and bring the handles to meet in front of you

o  Bring your arms back to the starting position. Aim for around three sets of 20 – 25 reps

The banded declined chest fly

And, of course, if it inclines, it should decline, too. The banded declined chest fly builds your lower pectoral muscles and provides a much more balanced upper body workout.

To start:

o  Anchor the band behind you above your head and wrap each handle around your hand. Hold your arms straight out to your sides, again, in a T formation, with your palms facing forward. Try not to lock your elbows

o  Stand far enough away from your anchor point (with the same amount of tension created in your band). Then pull the band forward and down to stomach level while keeping your arms relatively straight, bringing the handles to meet in front of you

o  Slowly bring your arms back to the starting position. Aim to do another three sets of 20 – 25 reps

The banded bench press

This exercise gets you back down on the floor where you may feel more comfortable strengthening your upper body. With the “banded bench press” (or, banded chest press) you only need a firm resistance band and a little bit of space. But you get just as effective a workout on your pectorals and upper arms.

To start:

o  Get into position on your back (preferably on a mat on the floor) with your band passing under your chest just below your armpits. Plant your feet firmly and lay with your knees bent

o  Wrap each end of the band around your hands, between the thumb and index finger, and position your arms in line with the top of your back, with your elbows resting on the floor and forearms vertical

o  Extend your arms upwards and inwards, without locking your elbows, until your hands meet in the middle just above your sternum. Return to place. Aim to do another three sets of 20 – 25 reps

The seated chest press

The seated chest press with resistance band

This exercise is a variation on the above bench press, but its versatility and ease of execution means that you can do it in just about every situation, like at the office, in a hotel, or even on the train (preferably if the train is empty).

To start:

o  Take the resistance bands and wrap them securely behind a chair––or attach them to the base of the chair. Always make sure you are using a solid, unshakeable base with any seated band workout

o  Sit down and pick up the bands, one in each hand. With your elbows, out, push your arms up at a 45° angle

o  Try to restrict all movement to only your chest and arms, never pushing too hard to cause discomfort. Aim for around two sets of 15 to 20 reps––or whatever your body tells you

There you have it. Five of the simplest and most effective resistance band chest fly exercises that you can do just about anywhere to strengthen your chest and arm muscles, boost your energy, and look and feel great.


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